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Can Might Make Rights?: Building the Rule of Law after Military Interventions (Hardcover), by Jane Stromseth, David Wippman and Rosa Brooks. Cambridge University Press (October 2, 2006).
This book looks at why it's so difficult to create 'the rule of law' in post-conflict societies such as Iraq and Afghanistan, and offers critical insights into how policy-makers and field-workers can improve future rule of law efforts. A must-read for policy-makers, field-workers, journalists and students trying to make sense of the international community's problems in Iraq and elsewhere, this book shows how a narrow focus on building institutions such as courts and legislatures misses the more complex cultural issues that affect societal commitment to the values associated with the rule of law. The authors place the rule of law in context, showing the interconnectedness between the rule of law and other post-conflict priorities, such as reestablishing security. The authors outline a pragmatic, synergistic approach to the rule of law which promises to reinvigorate debates about transitions to democracy and post-conflict reconstruction. Information

Customary International Humanitarian Law: Volume 2, Practice, Parts 1 and 2 (Hardcover), by Carolin Alvermann, Angela Cotroneo, Antoine Grand Baptiste Rolle (Contributors), Jean-Marie Henckaerts and Louise Doswald-Beck (Editors). Cambridge University Press (March 21, 2005).
In 1995, the International Committee of the Red Cross, along with a range of renowned experts, embarked upon a major international study into current state practice in humanitarian law in order to identify customary law in this area. This book (and its companion, Volume 1: Rules) is the result of that study. Volume 2 contains a summary of the relevant treaty law, international case-law and relevant state practice including legislation, military manuals, case-law, official statements, and official military practice for each aspect of humanitarian law.  Information

European Military Law Systems (Hardcover), by Georg Nolte (Editor). Walter de Gruyter (June 2003).  Information

Evolving Military Justice (Hardcover), by Eugene R. Fidell and Dwight H. Sullivan (Editors). US Naval Institute Press (June 15, 2002).
The book scrutinizes the current military justice system, identifying its strengths and weaknesses and pointing the way toward further improvements. Included are essays written about the American military justice system over the past decade by such notable authorities as Sam Nunn, former Senator from Georgia; Andrew S. Effron, Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces; and Brig. Gen. Jerry S.T. Pitzul, Judge Advocate General of the Canadian Forces. Some defend military justice, while others are critical. The book then shifts its focus overseas to compare the U.S. system with those of several other common law countries. Designed to provoke thought about military justice among military justice practitioners and military line officers alike, the book is introduced with an essay by William K. Suter, Clerk of the U.S. Supreme court. Information

Extraordinary Justice: Military Tribunals in Historical and International Context (Hardcover), by Peter Richards. NYU Press (June 1, 2007).
At this critical moment in time, Extraordinary Justice seeks to fill an important gap in our understanding of what military tribunals are, how they function, and how successful they are in administering justice by placing them in comparative and historical context. Peter Judson Richards examines tribunals in four modern conflicts: the American Civil War, the British experience in the Boer War, the French tribunals of the "Great War," and allied practices during the Second World War. Richards also examines the larger context of specific political, legal and military concerns, addressing scholarly and policy debates that continually arise in connection with the implementation of these extraordinary measures. He concludes that while the record of the national tribunals has been mixed, enduring elements in the character of warfare, of justice, and the nature of political reality together justify their continued use in certain situations. Information

From 9-11 to the Iraq War 2003: International Law in an Age of Complexity (Paperback), by Dominic McGoldrick. Hart Publishing (UK) (July 30, 2004). Information

International Law and International Security: Military and Political Dimensions : A U.S.-Soviet Dialogue (US-Post-Soviet Dialogues) (Hardcover), by Paul B. Stephan (Author), Boris M. Klimenko (Editor). M E Sharpe Inc (August 1992).  Information

International Law Reports: Volume 133 (International Law Reports) (Hardcover), by Karen Lee (Assistant), Elihu Lauterpacht, Christopher J. Greenwood, Andrew Oppenheimer (Editors). Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (June 30, 2008).
The International Law Reports is the only publication in the world wholly devoted to the regular and systematic reporting in English of decisions of international courts and arbitrators as well as judgments of national courts. Volume 133 reports on, amongst others, the 2007 decision of the European Court of Human Rights in Behrami and Saramati, the judgment of the Court of Appeal of Singapore in CAA v. Singapore Airlines and the related Canadian decision, and the English decisions of the High Court, Court of Appeal and House of Lords in Al-Skeini.  Information

Law, War & Crime: War Crimes, Trials and the Reinvention of International Law (Hardcover), by Gerry J. Simpson. Polity; 1 edition (October 15, 2007).
From events at Nuremberg and Tokyo after World War II, to the recent trials of Slobodan Miloaevi and Saddam Hussein, war crimes trials are an increasingly pervasive feature of the aftermath of conflict. In his new book, Law, War and Crime, Gerry Simpson explores the meaning and effect of such trials, and places them in their broader political and cultural contexts. The book traces the development of the war crimes field from its origins in the outlawing of piracy to its contemporary manifestation in the establishment of the International Criminal Court in The Hague.
 Simpson argues that the field of war crimes is constituted by a number of tensions between, for example, politics and law; local justice and cosmopolitan reckoning; collective guilt and individual responsibility; and between the instinct that war, at worst, is an error, and the conviction that war is a crime. Written in the wake of an extraordinary period in the life of the law, the book asks a number of critical questions. What does it mean to talk about war in the language of the criminal law? What are the consequences of seeking to criminalise the conduct of one's enemies? How did this relatively new phenomenon of putting on trial perpetrators of mass atrocity and defeated enemies come into existence? This book seeks to answer these important questions whilst shedding new light on the complex relationship between law, war and crime. 
Information

Principles of International Law (Concise Hornbook Series) (Paperback), by Sean D. Murphy. Thomson West; 1 edition (February 23, 2006).
This volume provides a comprehensive and up-to-date survey of public international law, with useful references throughout to classic and contemporary cases and scholarship. It is designed as a stand-alone text or as a complement to any of the major casebooks on the topic. The first section of the book addresses the fundamental history and structure of international law; the second section focuses on the interface of international law and national law; and the final section presents the treaties and rules that comprise the major fields of international law: human rights, law of the sea, international environmental law, and more.  Information

The Globalization of International Law (The International Library of Essays on Globalization and Law) (Hardcover), by Paul Schiff Berman (Editor). Ashgate Publishing (December 30, 2005). Information

The Legitimate Use of Military Force (Justice, International Law and Global Security) (Hardcover), by Howard M. Hensel (Editor). Ashgate (February 19, 2008).  Information

The Prohibition of Propaganda for War in International Law (Hardcover), by Michael Kearney. Oxford University Press, USA (January 6, 2008).
Drawing on primary materials from the League of Nations to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, this book makes the case for the revitalization of a provision of international law which can be fundamental to the prevention of war. The book examines international human rights law, the travaux preparatoires to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, communications between the Human Rights Committee and states parties to the Covenant, state practice, and international criminal law. Drawing on the manner by which international tribunals from Nuremberg to The Hague have approached the matter of individual criminal responsibility for 'incitement to crimes of an international dimension', the book proposes that 'direct and public incitement to aggression' be included as a crime in the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court.  Information

War Law: Understanding International Law and Armed Conflict (Paperback), by Michael Byers. Grove Press (March 1, 2007).
When President Bush insists our military forces have acted in accordance with international law, many other nations disagree. This happens so often that observers may wonder: exactly what laws are they arguing about? To readers willing to put in the work, this dense book provides the answers. According to Byers (The Role of Law in International Politics), laws governing war have existed since the 19th century, but nations freely disregarded them until the adoption of the U.N. Charter in 1945. The charter itself, however, is still subject to interpretation. When Israeli planes bombed an Iraqi nuclear facility in 1981, for example, the U.S. insisted that pre-emptive self-defense was not sanctioned. By 2003, America had changed its mind. Byers devotes three chapters to the complicated issue of self-defense, and another three to the equally contentious issue of humanitarian intervention: i.e., whether it's okay to invade a nation to stop it from committing unspeakable acts, such as genocide, or to bring democracy to its people. A final chapter attacks recent U.S. foreign policy, which, Byers argues, places American interests above international law and returns the world to the pre-1945 era when powerful nations routinely threw their weight around the globe, often with terrible consequences.  Information


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