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Iwo Jima Recon: The U.S. Navy at War, February 17, 1945 (At War) (Paperback), by Dick Camp. Zenith Press; First edition (February 15, 2007).
Iwo Jima, February 17, 1945: The mission: to scout the beaches for underwater obstacles and mines and determine whether the soil would support vehicles. Four Navy Underwater Demolition Teams (predecessor to the SEALS) and twenty-two Marine observers-backed by battleships Tennessee and Nevada, a cruiser, several destroyers, and twelve Landing Craft Infantry ships configured as gunboats proceeded with the operation. The story of what followed - the battle for Iwo Jima that no one knows - is fully told for the first time in this book, a heart-stopping account of ill-equipped but heroic forces under fire from an unexpected, overwhelming enemy. Drawing on first-person accounts, deck logs, and after-action reports, Dick Camp brings the action to harrowing life: the thin-skinned reconfigured LCIs fighting it out with the Japanese in a valiant effort to protect the swimmers caught five hundred yards off the beach; the battleship Nevada ignoring orders to withdraw and moving in to knock out the enemy’s heavy caliber guns; the devastating action - casualities of 40 percent - that very likely saved the actual landing on the 19th. Information

Lessons Not Learned: The U.S. Navy's Status Quo Culture (Hardcover), by Roger Thompson. Naval Institute Press (April 6, 2007).
"The US Navy is among the most powerful fighting forces in the world, yet it has repeatedly been embarrassed in exercises with smaller and less technologically equipped forces. In Lessons Not Learned, respected military scholar Roger Thompson discusses the institutional biases, the outmoded strategic thinking, the use of the wrong technology at the wrong times, and much more. This book is a scholarly and perceptive study that delves into all of this, and more, and helps the reader understand why such a formidable force is not living up to its potential. This is a must-read for naval scholars, strategists, or anyone who really cares about the Navy and its sailors." Information

Serving Proudly: A History of Women in the U.S. Navy (Hardcover), by Susan H. Godson. US Naval Institute Press (January 2002).
Godson covers the range of U.S. women's naval service, on the front lines (where some disguised themselves as men), as nurses, and as other support personnel. She also attends to the social background of each expansion and contraction of women's roles in the navy, assimilating the latest material in gender studies and arraying it for serious scholars in a formidable bibliography and footnotes. No previous book has attempted to bring all those topics together in a single study spanning two centuries. If Godson's falls short of being an ideal introduction to the subject, it is because her prose is a trifle academic and coverage of events after 1990, a period that included the Gulf War and the Tailhook scandal, is cursory because of the lack of scholarly material on them. Readers possessing some knowledge of naval and gender studies will find it coming in handy for fully appreciating Godson's contribution to the work in progress that is women's service in the U.S. Navy. Information

The Philadelphia Navy Yard: From the Birth of the U.S. Navy to the Nuclear Age (Barra Foundation Book) (Hardcover), by Jeffery M. Dorwart. University of Pennsylvania Press (November 2000).
In this definitive history of one of America's most illustrious military institutions, Jeffery M. Dorwart explains how the Philadelphia Navy Yard struggled throughout its history to survive, while remaining a viable and integral part of the nation's defense. Illustrated with 125 archival photographs and 10 detailed maps, The Philadelphia Navy Yard provides a candid and complete history of the relationship of this important facility to local and national politics and social and economic change, while highlighting the contributions of America's first government-operated naval shipyard. Information

Tip of the Spear: U.S. Navy Carrier Units and Operations 1974-2000 (Hardcover), by Rick Morgan. Schiffer Publishing (January 2007).
This book presents a detailed tabular review of U.S. carriers and squadrons between the end of Vietnam and the start of the new millennium. Over 200 separate at sea periods are covered in this work. Each chapter contains impressive data that details every major carrier deployment covered. Each ship, wing and squadron that operated during the period is included as well as short narrative commentary that provides a wealth of background information. Combat and near-combat operations are covered as well with specific emphasis placed on the units involved and victories/losses in each engagement. Squadron lineages as well as background information on each of the Navy's carrier aviation communities is included. Information

To Be a U.S. Navy SEAL (Paperback), by Cliff Hollenbeck. Zenith Press (August 2003).
This is an introduction into what it really means to be a U.S. Navy SEAL in today's U.S. Navy-in the sea, in the air, and on the land. The U.S. Navy's elite specialists are among the most highly trained forces capable of undertaking dangerous missions into enemy territory. Hollenbeck takes you through the relentless twenty-five week training, including "hell" week, when soldiers are put through five days of training with fewer than 4 hours of sleep.About the Author and Photographer:Cliff Hollenbeck and Dick Couch followed SEAL Class 228 through months of rigorous training. Their words and photos are one of the most accurate portrayals of this demanding program ever put into print.   Information

To the Shores of Tripoli: The Birth of the U.S. Navy and Marines (Bluejacket Books) (Paperback), by A. B. C. Whipple. Naval Institute Press (September 2001).
For centuries, Barbary Coast pirates had been terrorizing merchant shippers and forcing their governments to pay tribute--until the frigate Philadelphia was captured in 1803 and President Thomas Jefferson decided to put an end to the extortion. Whipple ( The Challenge ) shows how the Barbary War in the early 19th century included the first major challenge to U.S. foreign policy, America's first hostage crisis and the first subversive plot to overthrow the head of an unfriendly government (the war also served as the first proving ground of the U.S. Navy and Marines). Jefferson sent four successive naval squadrons against Tripoli. All failed to gain the release of the Philadelphia 's crew. Finally, an Army captain named William Eaton ("one of the lost heroes of U.S. history") led a handful of Marines and a polyglot mercenary mob on a 500-mile epic journey across the Libyan desert. Their capture of the city of Derna led indirectly to the release of the prisoners and a treaty (1805), but did not end the threat of piracy to U.S. shipping. Whipple's vigorous you-are-there style brings to life all the color and drama of this neglected period in American history. Information

U.S. Navy (U.S. Military Series) (Hardcover), by M. Hill Goodspeed. Universe (October 7, 2003). Information

U.S. Navy Diving Manual (Hardcover). AquaPress; 5Rev Ed edition (September 11, 2006).  Information

U.S. Navy Guided Missile Frigates, Oliver Hazard Perry Class - plus AEGIS Combat System for Cruisers and Destroyers, Comprehensive Information and Photo Galleries (CD-ROM) (CD-ROM), by Department of Defense. Progressive Management (May 16, 2007).
This up-to-date electronic book on CD-ROM has comprehensive coverage of the U.S. Navy's fleet of Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided missile frigates, with extensive photo galleries. In addition, it has complete coverage of the AEGIS Combat System for Cruisers and Destroyers. This extraordinary, encyclopedic collection contains more than 24,000 pages reproduced in Adobe Acrobat PDF files. FRIGATES - Frigates fulfill a Protection of Shipping (POS) mission as Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) combatants for amphibious expeditionary forces, underway replenishment groups and merchant convoys. The guided missile frigates (FFG) bring an anti-air warfare (AAW) capability to the frigate mission, but they have some limitations. Designed as cost efficient surface combatants, they lack the multi-mission capability necessary for modern surface combatants faced with multiple, high-technology threats. They also offer limited capacity for growth. Despite this, the FFG 7 class is a robust platform, capable of withstanding considerable damage. This "toughness" was aptly demonstrated when USS Samuel B. Roberts struck a mine and USS Stark was hit by two Exocet cruise missiles. In both cases the ships survived, were repaired and returned to the fleet. USS Stark was decommissioned in May 1999. The Surface Combatant Force Requirement Study does not define any need for a single mission ship such as the frigate and there are no frigates planned in the Navy's five-year shipbuilding plan. AEGIS - The Aegis system was designed as a total weapon system, from detection to kill. The heart of the system is an advanced, automatic detect and track, multi-function phased-array radar, the AN/SPY-1. This high powered (four megawatt) radar is able to perform search, track and missile guidance functions simultaneously with a track capacity of over 100 targets. The first Engineering Development Model (EDM-1) was installed in the test ship, USS Norton Sound (AVM 1) in 1973. Information


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