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Aden Insurgency: The Savage War in South Arabia 1962-67 (Hardcover), by Jonathan Walker. Spellmount (May 1, 2003).
Featuring vivid eyewitness accounts from combatants, civilians and terrorists alike, a new, riveting and important account of Britain's last End of Empire conflict. As Cold War tensions escalated, a brutal fight was contested with the rebel tribes of the wild interior as well as terrorist assassins in the back streets of Aden. Revealing the truth behind the 'Mad Mitch' legend and his clash with the high command and the successes and disasters of early SAS operation, this is one of the very few modern studies to examine Britain's clandestine war in neighboring Yemen alongside her conflict in South America. Information

Between Memory and Desire: The Middle East in a Troubled Age (Paperback), by R. Stephen Humphreys. University of California Press; 2 edition (November 16, 2005).
R. Steven Humphreys reveals the rich complexity of the Middle East--a region that stretches from Egypt to Afghanistan--in Between Memory and Desire, a set of ten "interlocking essays" that take on everything from economic growth and nationalist movements to Islamic human rights philosophy. Humphreys has a very clear and concise writing style that makes easily comprehensible an enormous amount of historical and cultural data with which most Western readers will be largely unfamiliar. He demolishes many of the mythic images that Americans have built up around the region and its people, like the "madman" dictator: "When we look beyond the façade of theater and posturing," Humphreys writes, "we will almost always discern a hard-headed politician who knows perfectly well how to set his goals and to craft strategies for achieving them.... The problem for us is not that the goals of Middle Eastern leaders are impenetrable; most of the time they are quite transparent. The problem is simply that these goals are not the ones that we want them to have."  Information

Caught in the Middle East: U.S. Policy toward the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1945-1961 (Hardcover), by Peter L. Hahn. The University of North Carolina Press (February 27, 2006).
American officials desired--in principle--to promote Arab-Israeli peace in order to stabilize the region. Yet Hahn shows how that desire for peace was not always an American priority, as U.S. leaders consistently gave more weight to their determination to contain the Soviet Union than to their desire to make peace between Israel and its neighbors. During these critical years the United States began to supplant Britain as the dominant Western power in the Middle East, and U.S. leaders found themselves in two notable predicaments. They were unable to relinquish the responsibilities they had accepted with their new power--even as those responsibilities became increasingly difficult to fulfill. And they were caught in the middle of the Arab-Israeli conflict, unable to resolve a dispute that would continue to generate instability for years to come.  Information

Colonialism and Revolution in the Middle East: Social and Cultural Origins of Egypt's 'Urabi Movement (Paperback), by Juan R I Cole. American University in Cairo Press (December 1, 2000).
In this stimulating study, Cole challenges traditional elite-centered conceptions of the conflict that led to the British occupation of Egypt in 1882. For a year before the British intervened, Egypt's government and the country's influential European community had been locked in a struggle with the nationalist supporters of General Ahmad 'Urabi. Although most Western observers till see the 'Urabi movement as a 'revolt' of junior military officers with only limited support among the Egyptian people, Cole maintains hat it was a broadly based social revolution hardly underway when it was cutt off by the British. While arguing this fresh point of view, he also proposes a theory of revolutions against informal or neo-colonial empires, drawing parallels between Egypt in 1882, the Boxer Rebellion in China, and the Islamic Revolution in modern Iran. Information

Conflict and Insurgency in the Contemporary Middle East (Middle Eastern Military Studies) (Hardcover), by Barry Rubin. Routledge; 1 edition (February 27, 2009). Information

Inside the Resistance: The Iraqi Insurgency and the Future of the Middle East (Nation Books) (Hardcover), by Zaki Chehab. Nation Books (October 26, 2005).
Since the fall of Baghdad in April 2003, Zaki Chebah has had unique access to numerous groups within the resistance as well as to leading figures in the tribal groups who define much of Iraqi society. Inside the Resistance describes the methods of the Iraqi resistance movements (there are many), and the extent of the involvement of Al-Qaeda and other foreign fighters. This book also examines how the events of Iraq have affected Syria, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Turkey and Iran. No journalist is better placed to explain the intricacies of the battle over Iraq and to write vividly from personal experience about life on the front lines of Tikirt, Mosul and Fallujah. Using first-hand reportage, interviews with leading figures on all sides of the conflict, and his insight in Arab sensibilities, Zaki Chebah provides an authoritative and gripping insight into life in Iraq and his analysis for its future.  Information

Iraq's Insurgency and the Road to Civil Conflict [Two Volumes] (Hardcover), by Anthony H. Cordesman and Emma R. Davies. Praeger Security International Multi-volume (December 30, 2007).
The war in Iraq has expanded from a struggle between Coalition forces and the remnants of former regime loyalists to a multi-faceted conflict involving numerous Sunni groups, Shi'ite militias, Kurdish nationals, and foreign jihadists. Iraq's Insurgency and the Road to Civil Conflict is Anthony Cordesman's latest assessment of the Iraqi conflict and documents its entire evolution, from the history of ethnic tensions through the current U.S. "surge." He identifies each actor in the arena, analyzes their motivations, and presents a detailed record of their actions, tactics, and capabilities. Cordesman's exhaustive study, based on meticulous research, is the most thorough account of the war to date. Beginning with the consequences of imperial colonialism and touching upon the ethnic tensions throughout Saddam's regime, Cordesman examines and details the confluence of forces and events that have paved the way toward Iraq's current civil conflict. He analyzes major turning points, including elections, economic developments, and key incidents of violence that continue to shape the war. Finally, he outlines the lessons learned from this history and what can and cannot be done to stabilize the nation. Information

Losing Iraq: Insurgency and Politics (Hardcover), by Stephen C. Pelletiere. Praeger Security International General Interest-Cloth (October 30, 2007).
Pelletiere is a former CIA policy analyst on Iraq during the Iran-Iraq War, instructor at the US Army War College, and the author of several previous books, two on the US and oil politics (e.g., America's Oil Wars, CH, Feb'05, 42-3684). He has earned a reputation for assertive, controversial positions, and, as in his earlier books, he argues that US involvement in both Iraqi Wars was driven by a neocon, pro-Zionist, military-industrial cabal with the desire to control oil in the Gulf regions and to assure high corporate war/reconstruction profits. His litany of the colossal errors, misjudgments, and calamities of the Bush administration, especially by Donald Rumsfeld, Paul Bremer, and the neocon coterie, has been well established by others, but Pelletiere adds several new twists. Most importantly, he deems the Iraqi Baathist state totalitarian and cruel but legitimate, because Sunnis, Shias, and Kurds were essentially committed to a unified state for which they have been willing to fight and die. He contends that the insurgency was not external, but homegrown and US-inspired....the book is a compendium of interesting tidbits of information. For those with enough background to separate dross from gold, it is worth reading. Highly recommended.  Information

Oman's Insurgencies: The Sultanate's Struggle for Supremacy (Hardcover), by J.E. Peterson. Saqi Books (February 1, 2008).
J.E. Peterson takes a detailed look at the crises that have tested the mettle of Oman's army and accelerated its development, surveying its transition from a strictly traditional regime controlling only parts of the country to a modern, inclusive state, particularly in terms of security concerns. J.E. Peterson is a political analyst specializing in the Arabian Peninsula and the Gulf. He is affiliated with the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at The University of Arizona in Tucson. Information

Revolution and Foreign Policy: The Case of South Yemen, 1967-1987 (Cambridge Middle East Library) (Paperback), by Fred Halliday. Cambridge University Press; New Ed edition (April 4, 2002).
This book is a study of the foreign policy of South Yemen, the most radical of Arab states, from the time of its independence from Britain in 1967 until 1987. It covers relations with the west, including the USA, and with the USSR and China, and also highlights South Yemen's conflicts with its neighbours, North Yemen, Saudi Arabia and Oman. The author provides a detailed analysis of the foreign relations of one of the USSR's closest allies in the Third World and shows how conflicts within the country relate to changes in foreign policy. South Yemen has traditionally not been an easy country to study, both because it is so secretive and because the revolutionary regime still arouses such strong passions. Professor Halliday was able to visit the country and to make an outstandingly thorough study of the foreign policy of an Arab state.  Information

The Middle East and Palestine: Global Politics and Regional Conflict (Hardcover), by Dietrich Jung (Editor). Palgrave Macmillan (August 26, 2004).
Taking issue with the convenient views that the Middle East is an irrational and exceptional region of world politics and that the long and bloody history of the Palestine conflict is proof, the authors of this stimulating collection combine theoretical reflection and empirical investigation, marrying International Relations theory and Middle East studies. Through integrating macro- and micro-perspectives, tracing the interaction of global and regional environments with individuals pursuing political goals, this book rejects the cultural stereotype of "Middle Eastern exceptionalism" and argues that regional patterns of conflict are deeply embedded in international and transnational relations and that their particular trajectories have to be interpreted in the light of global political developments. Information

The Middle East in International Relations: Power, Politics and Ideology (The Contemporary Middle East) (Hardcover), by Fred Halliday. Cambridge University Press (January 31, 2005).
The international relations of the Middle East have long been dominated by uncertainty and conflict. External intervention, interstate war, political upheaval and interethnic violence are compounded by the vagaries of oil prices and the claims of military nationalist and religious movements. Fred Halliday sets this region and its conflicts in context, providing on the one hand, a historical introduction to its character and problems, and, on the other, a reasoned analysis of its politics. In an engagement with both the study of the Middle East and the theoretical analysis of international relations, Halliday, one of the best known and most respected scholars writing on the region today, offers a compelling and original interpretation. Written in a clear, accessible and interactive style, the book is designed for students, policymakers, and the general reader. Fred Halliday is Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics. He is the author and editor of several publications including Two Hours that Shook the World: September 11, 2001: Causes and Consequences (Tauris, 2002), Islam & the Myth of Confrontation (Tauris, 2002), The World at 2000: Perils and Promises (Macmillan, 2001), and Nation and Religion in the Middle East (Lynne Rienner, 2000). Information


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