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A Handbook of Terrorism and Insurgency in Southeast Asia (Elgar Original Reference) (Hardcover), by Andrew T. H. Tan (Editor). Edward Elgar Publishing (September 30, 2007).  Information

Conflict, Terrorism and the Media in Asia (Routledge Media, Culture and Social Change in Asia) (Hardcover), by Ben Cole (Editor). Routledge; 1 edition (May 25, 2006).
There are many different kinds of sub-national conflicts across Asia, with a variety of causes, but since September 11 2001 these have been increasingly portrayed as part of the global terrorist threat, to be dealt with by the "war on terror". This book examines a wide range of such conflicts, showing how, despite significant differences between them, they have in common the role of the media as interlocutor, and exploring how the media exercises this role. The book raises a number of issues concerning how the media reports different forms of political violence and conflict, including issues of impartiality in the media's relations with both governments and insurgents, and how the focus on the "war on terror" has led to some forms of violence, notably those employed by states for political purposes, to be overlooked.  Information

Essays on Human Rights and Terrorism: Comparative Approaches to Civil Liberties in Asia, the EU and North America (Hardcover), by Conor Gearty. Cameron May (February 17, 2008).
Conor Gearty has been writing on human rights, civil liberties and terrorism for over twenty-five years. In this book, his writings on the global, regional and comparative dimensions to his subject are brought together for the first time. The book contains articles from law journals and literary periodicals as well as written versions of a number of distinguished lectures on these topics that have been given by the author. There are also three especially commissioned pieces on the particular application of human rights law and practice in Asia, dealing with the universality of human rights, the impact of 'Asian values' on human rights, and the challenge posed by China for contemporary human rights thinking. With chapters on the United States and the European region, and also on such terrorism/human rights related problems as Northern Ireland, the book offers a broad overview of a series of legal issues pressing in on the world today. Written in the author's characteristically lucid style, the book should appeal to international lawyers, comparative lawyers, practitioners in the field of terrorism and human rights and to the general reader concerned to understand some of the most important challenges facing the world today. Information

Falling Terrorism and Rising Conflicts: The Afghan "Contribution" to Polarization and Confrontation in West and South Asia (Hardcover), by Hooman Peimani. Praeger Publishers (September 30, 2003).
Contrary to expectations, the fall of the Taliban did not bring peace and stability to Afghanistan. The Afghan interim government is simply too weak to act as a central government; this results in the re-emergence of warlords, turf wars, and the expansion of drug trafficking. This unstable situation may well result in the emergence of Taliban-like groups. Added to this, the threat of the spillover of instability from Afghanistan into neighboring regions, on the one hand, and the rapid expansion of American military and political power in Central Asia, the Caucasus, the Persian Gulf, Afghanistan, and Pakistan, on the other, have created fear among the regional powers. The stated indefinite stay of American forces well after the end of the anti-terrorist war in Afghanistan has worsened that fear as it reflected the American government's plan to pursue certain strategic interests unrelated to that war. Consequently, as Peimani shows, the regional anti-terrorist coalition has disintegrated in the absence of a common objective to help focus the region. Fear of the long-term American objectives and those of its Pakistani ally in South and West Asia incompatible with those of the regional powers have facilitated the creation of two camps consisting of Iran, India, and Russia, to which China is affiliated, and Pakistan and the United States. Respectively, these implicit and explicit camps are likely to collide over their regional interests especially in the strategically important energy-producing Persian Gulf and Caspian Sea regions.  Information

Fostering Fundamentalism: Terrorism, Democracy And American Engagement in Central Asia (Us Foreign Policy and Conflict in the Islamic World) (Us Foreign ... Policy and Conflict in the Islamic World) (Hardcover), by Matthew Crosston. Ashgate Publishing (September 30, 2006).  Information

Madrasas in South Asia: Teaching Terror? (Routledge Contemporary South Asia) (Hardcover), by Jamal Malik. Routledge; 1 edition (December 13, 2007).
After 9/11, madrasas have been linked to international terrorism. They are suspected to foster anti-western, traditionalist or even fundamentalist views and to train al-Qaeda fighters. This has led to misconceptions on madrasa-education in general and its role in South Asia in particular. Government policies to modernize and “pacify” madrasas have been precipitous and mostly inadequate. This book discusses the educational system of madrasas in South Asia. It gives a contextual account of different facets of madrasa education from historical, anthropological, theological, political and religious studies perspectives. Some contributions offer recommendations on possible “ and necessary “ reforms of religious educational institutions. It also explores the roots of militancy and sectarianism in Pakistan, as well as its global context. Overall, the book tries to correct misperceptions on the role of madrasas, by providing a more balanced discussion,which denies neither the shortcomings of religious educational institutions in South Asia nor their important contributions to mass education.   Information

State Terrorism and Political Identity in Indonesia Fatally Belonging (Politics in Asia Series) (Hardcover), by Ariel Heryanto. Routledge; 1 edition (December 16, 2005).
Approximately one million innocent Indonesians were killed by their fellow nationals, neighbors, and kin at the height of an anti-communist campaign in the mid-1960s. This book investigates the profound political consequences of these mass killings in Indonesia upon public life, highlighting the historical specificities of the violence and comparable incidents of identity politics in more recent times. Mixing theory with empirically based analysis, the book examines how the specter of communism and the trauma experienced in the latter half of the 1960s remain critical in understanding the dynamics of terror, coercion, and consent today. Heryanto challenges the general belief that the periodic anti-communist witch-hunts of recent Indonesian history are largely a political tool used by a powerful military elite and authoritarian government. The book investigates what drove otherwise apolitical subjects to be complicit in the engulfing cycles of witch-hunts. It argues that elements of what began asan anti-communist campaign took on a life of their own, increasingly operating independently of the violence and individual subjects who appeared to be manipulating the campaigns in the 1980s and 1990s. Despite the profound importance of the 1965-6 events it remains one of most difficult and sensitive topics for public discussion in Indonesia today. State Terrorism and Political Identity in Indonesia is one of the first books to fully discuss the mass killings, shedding new light on a largely unspoken and unknown part of Indonesia's history.  Information

Terrorism & Militancy in South Asia (Hardcover), by Niranjan Dass. MD Pub Pvt Ltd (July 30, 2006).  Information

Terrorism And Violence In Southeast Asia: Transnational Challenges To States (Paperback), by Paul J. Smith. M.E. Sharpe (September 30, 2004). Information

Terrorism In South Asia: Views From India (Regionalism & Regional Security) (Paperback), by Adluri Subramanyam Raju (Editor). Marshall Cavendish Academic (August 30, 2005).
The ongoing encroachment of terrorism, escalating levels of violence, and the subsequent erosion of society's psyche and quality of life are addressed in this look at terrorism in India. Written from the point of view of Indian citizens, these 17 papers examine such subjects as bioterrorism, terrorist invasions in South Asia and Kashmir, new trends in terrorism, and women and terrorism.  Information

The Talibanization of Southeast Asia: Losing the War on Terror to Islamist Extremists (Hardcover), by Bilveer Singh. Praeger Security International General Interest-Cloth (October 30, 2007).
Long before the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, awakened the United States and the Western world to the heightened level of the terrorist threat, Southeast Asia had been dealing with this threat. The bombing in Bali that killed 202 people, many of them Australian tourists, was by no means the region's first experience with Islamic extremism, which can be traced back to the 1940s, and the Darul Islam struggle. The most recent group to emerge is Al-Jama'ah Al-Islamiyah (AJAI), the most potent Islamic terrorist organization to date in the region and the group behind the Bali bombing. Prior to 9/11, the terrorist challenge was essentially national in character, with groups attempting either to secede from the central government to form a new state or to force the central government to adopt policies that would support the raison d'etre of these extremist groups. Essentially, this involved the establishment of a political system that was more Islamic in character, either nationally or within a specific territory of a national state. This book analyzes the increasing Talibanization of Southeast Asia, a relatively new phenomenon that involves the adoption of Islamist doctrines, ideologies, and values that are largely militant in character, and that for some groups includes the adoption of violence to achieve their goals. Understanding this process of Talibanization in Southeast Asia, which was once an oasis of moderate Islam in the modern world, is the key to unraveling the mystery of the increased radicalization in the region. The AJAI represents the birth of the first regional terrorist organization in Southeast Asia. It is a transnational terrorist organization along the lines of al-Qaeda. It aims to establish a regional Islamic state covering most of southern Southeast Asia that would ultimately form a new Islamic epicenter in the Asia-Pacific region. Additionally, what has made the AJAI a potent force has been its ability to synergize with various existing religious extremist groups in the region and beyond, including al-Qaeda and other like-minded groups based in Afghanistan and Pakistan. This has succeeded in posing one of the most serious security challenges to the region since the end of the Cold War. Jihadists are operating in small and localized cells even though the broad goals remain the same, namely, to spread sharia, establish an Islamic state, and bring down secular regimes. As most governments do not have the credibility or the expertise to diminish the threat posed by Islamist extremism, Wahhabism, and Salafism, Southeast Asia is in danger of being Talibanized in the near future. Information

Understanding Terrorism in South Asia (Hardcover), by Regional Centre for Strategic Studies. Manohar (February 2, 2006). Information


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